All Things Kayaking

Fall comes to Nassawango Creek

 

For those interested in viewing the Cypress Trees near Snow Hill, MD, a trip on Nassawango Creek  provides that opportunity. For a round trip of 10 miles launch at Byrd Park in Snow Hill onto the Pocomoke River. One of the nicest launches around you can usually park and unload right at the ramp. In late September 2017 astronomical high tides sent the water spilling up the launch ramp.   Easiest launch we’ve ever seen!

20170917_131343_High tide at Snow Hill Park

From the ramp turn downstream, left, on the Pocomoke. The direction of this trip means you will probably be paddling against the tidal flow in at least one direction. On this trip, the sky was overcast but the river waters were still and easy to paddle. Unlike other trips in this area you will not see open marsh. Instead hardwood swamps come to the river’s edge. Paddling 1.8 miles downstream will bring you to the mouth of the Nassawango Creek.  A lone cypress tree grows in the middle of the junction between Nassawango Creek and the Pocomoke. A channel marker usually features an osprey nest. This late in the season the osprey have left the area.

 

Turning right into Nassawango Creek, we began to notice large water-lily fields struggling to stay dry in the high tide. When the water is low parts of Nassawango Creek are filled with water lilies challenging paddlers to find a trail.

20170917_135209_Entering Nassawango Creek

A short distance from the mouth of the Nassawango we met the bridge over Nassawango Road.  On this high tide, my husband and I bent over nearly double in our kayaks to  safely avoid the large metal bolts under the bridge.

20170917_141139_Approaching the bridge on Nassawango RoadPaddling further upstream, on the Nassawango, the first hints of fall color began to appear in the tree foliage along the bank.  Growing even more intense in coming weeks, this beckons us back for a colorful fall paddle in late October.

As expected due to the high tide shorebird sightings were non-existent. However, rarely on our trips on DELMARVA do we fail to see a bald eagle. This day didn’t disappoint. An eagle streaked by allowing us to quickly to snap a photo, just before it disappeared in the trees.

20170917_142230_Eagle Flyby

A little less than two miles upstream on the Nassawango, the Nature Conservancy has maintained a spot for putting ashore. However, it seems it is no longer maintained and is quickly becoming overgrown. Additionally, the creek has cut away at the landing spot resulting in the water being quite deep to the edge of the bank.

Above the Nature Conservancy site, the width of the Nassawango diminishes and the waters calm becoming more reflective.  Amazingly, the quantities of water lilies increase once again. The best guidance through this area is to stay to the left bank. Most of the way, the water trail seems to run along the left bank, unless there is an obvious better direction.

Only occasionally have we been able to paddle as far as the bridge at Red House Road. If the water level allows be sure and take advantage of the opportunity. This stretch of the Nassawango is beautiful! From Byrd Park in Snow Hill it is five miles to Red House Road bridge.

Here and there along the Nassawango we encountered large trees along the banks delighting us with their majesty and stately demeanor.

Paddling back to the put-in ramp at Byrd Park  a second eagle swooped down to the Pocomoke to perch on a branch just inches from the water.  We had no clue what attracted his attention. We suspect a fish was soon to be his dinner.

20170917_170540_Eagle on the water

Our trip for the day was just over 10 miles.  The stately trees, evolving Fall foliage, and water-lily beds made it a beautiful adventure.

20170917_211527_GPS Topo Map

Trip advised for Intermediate Paddlers. The Pocomoke has the potential on a windy day to be quite choppy.

Launch Site: Byrd Park in Snow Hill. Restrooms (port a john in off-season)

Services: Fast food in Snow Hill.

For more Kayaking Delmarva blog posts visit our Blog Index.

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